Home

News

Students unite to appreciate SpongeBob SquarePants

In the underwater city of Bikini Bottom, a yellow sponge and a pink starfish have been sharing their adventures on the television screen for more than 10 years.

Last fall, the UW SpongeBob Appreciation Club was formed to celebrate the Nickelodeon cartoon “SpongeBob SquarePants” through weekly meetings and events. They currently have more than 70 members in the club.

UW custodians call for improved working conditions

A group of 65 marched, signs in hand, from Red Square to the third floor of Gerberding Hall Tuesday morning chanting, “Fill the vacancies.” 

The group — comprised of UW employees, union representatives, and students — gathered to rally against unfair working conditions for UW custodians and janitors.

Crime blotter

A female UW student contacted the UW Police Department (UWPD) on Jan. 12 because of an ongoing problem with her ex-boyfriend. Her ex-boyfriend would not stop calling and texting her; she received over 100 phone calls from him in one day. He had also threatened to post naked photographs of her, which she did not know he had taken, to Facebook. The couple signed a lease together in September, but she has been staying with friends since they broke up on Dec. 31.

Japanese politician discusses nuclear energy troubles

Before his lecture Monday night, Tarō Konō asked the audience gathered in Kane Hall whether they were in the right place. 

RSO Rundown

This column keeps tabs on the activities of the UW’s Registered Student Organizations (RSO). The following events are courtesy of RSOs and communities on campus. 

Tuesday, Jan. 27

Ukulele Union meeting

The power of the powwow

Amidst the ubiquitous clinking of tiny bells and the persistent smell of hot fry bread it was difficult to remember that one was in the HUB 211: Ballroom on Saturday. 

An annual event sponsored by the UW American Indian Student Commission (AISC), the Winter Pow Wow transformed the ballroom into a gathering space and celebration ground for a community and its culture. 

One Night Count reports increase in homelessness

It was 2:40 a.m., and the steady tapping of footsteps echoed through an alley in the U-District. As the group of four reached the main street, they suddenly stopped walking, yet their eyes roamed as a man on a bicycle passed by.

“I know that guy,” said Kate Phillips of Street Youth Ministries, a faith-based organization serving homeless and at-risk youth. “I’m going to count him as ‘walking around.’”

Primate center cited for deaths of infant monkeys but still in compliance with Animal Welfare Act

The Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) has been the subject of much controversy, but in the recent deaths of juvenile monkeys, head officials at the center assured the public that negligence was not the cause.

Six months in: Startup Hall creates common space for students, entrepreneurs

An open room with glass ceilings, filled with whiteboards and long discussion tables, and a lounge lined with leather couches has become the home to some of Seattle’s newest innovators.

Panelists discuss French politics in wake of tragedy

The room was divided into two main spheres: Older community members concentrated in front, younger students coalesced in back. 

Despite their physical separation, the two groups were brought together by their concern about recent world events and thirst for deeper understanding. 

This group, comprised of about 80 people, gathered in Thomson Hall on Wednesday night for a forum on “Paris and Beyond: Making Sense of the World.”