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Scouring the Sound

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Tor Bjorklund and Ben Lee watch the CTD (conductivity, temperature and depth) rise from about 125 meters below Elliott Bay after taking numerous measurements of the seawater.

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ESS 230 co-professor Chuck Nittrouer signals a winch to stop as it pulls up the Kasten corer from the seafloor of Elliott Bay.

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Marine technician Casey Canfield checks if all of the Niskin bottles are cocked correctly in order to collect seawater samples from Elliott Bay.

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David Montgomery, co-professor of ESS 230, points out the glacial depression in Puget Sound on a digital elevation model that highlights both elevation above and below the ground.

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Students compare and contrast the seafloor sediments from the Nisqually Reach and farther up the Puget Sound.

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Co-professor Chuck Nittrouer and TA Aaron Fricke explain the procedure for removing seafloor sediment samples from a box corer in Elliott Bay.

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To avoid overcrowding the hull of the Thomas G. Thompson, students wait to enter the ship in pairs of two.

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While performing various scientific tests on deck, life jackets were required to be worn by all participants.

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The R/V Thomas G. Thompson, owned by the U.S. Navy and maintained by the UW, provides students an opportunity to research aboard a world-class research vessel.

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Students fill vans before sunrise in the parking lot northwest of Johnson Hall.

Many agree that learning first-hand in the field or in the office beats learning in a dark, dingy classroom any day. With learning in mind, the students of ESS 230 received an opportunity to cruise aboard the R/V Thomas G. Thompson, a 274-foot research vessel maintained by the UW. While on board, students ran tests, collected samples and toured the ship like the scientists living aboard. Perhaps one day they will develop their own research.

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