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Choreographer Mark Morris opens up

The 400-person crowd whispered excitedly as Mark Morris of the Mark Morris Dance Group sat down for a conversation with radio personality Gigi Yellen-Kohn in Kane Hall on Wednesday night about his younger years in Seattle, his love of choreography, and a desire to experience music in the most authentic way as possible.

Dawg House Riders make finals in Red Bull video competition

A video produced by the Dawg House Riders, a new freestyle snow sports Registered Student Organization (RSO) on campus, has made it to the final round of the Red Bull Bracket Reel: Knock Out, Best-Edit Film Battle, which ends Thursday at 11 p.m. 

Growing the UW Farm

Student-run farm promotes crowdfunding campaign


Sports

Pac-12 women’s basketball power rankings week nine

The Pac-12 Tournament is here and it appears that five teams from the conference are locks for selection to the NCAA tournament on March 16. Oregon State, Arizona State, Stanford, California, and Washington are all very likely to be announced among the field of 64.

Pan ties school record with individual title in Cabo San Lucas

Entering the final round of the Querencia Cabo Collegiate on Tuesday morning, senior Cheng-Tsung Pan found himself in a three-way tie for first place with Viraat Badhwar of Stanford and South Florida’s Rigel Fernandes.

Huskies get win in Southern California despite high scores

After an opening day in which high scores were the theme across the board, the No. 1 Washington women’s golf team struggled Tuesday. But the Huskies had built up such a large lead on the first day that it didn’t matter.


Opinion

Will’s word of the week: goofball

Warning: This column contains mentions of drugs. I’ll explain in a moment.

But first, I suspect we all know goofballs, or think we do. These are the sorts of silly people, who, when faced with the complexities and challenges of life, turn to humor (or create it). Think Kramer from “Seinfeld,” or Schmidt, for you young, bright things out there, from “New Girl.”

There is beauty in recovery but not in the breakdown

Nothing is glamorous about a mental health disorder

Those left behind

How public schools are failing our most vulnerable students


Arts & Leisure

Yoga and a show

The yoga and art project at Henry Art Gallery

Pop culture news

Live long and prosper 

Daytripper: Welcome to Twin Peaks

A trip to Snoqualmie, Washington


Features

Circus school offers competition-free alternative athleticism

You don’t have to wait for the Ringling Bros. or Cirque du Soleil to come to town to catch a glimpse of the circus. Even better, you don’t have to be a trapeze or juggling master to participate in circus life either.

The School of Acrobatics & New Circus Arts (SANCA), located in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood, claims to be the largest circus school in the nation. Founded in 2004 with only five students, SANCA has now grown to serve more than 1,000 students in weekly classes and has served almost 50,000 people in all.

It's not about your age, it's about your attitude

UW Sigma Kappa house director stays active at 85

Coming full circle

UW alumna survives cancer and helps provide scholarships to other patients


Science

Campus Pulse

Urbanization causing ‘rapid evolutionary changes,’ says UW paper

 

A recent paper published in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution explores “rapid evolutionary changes” in the ecosystem caused by urbanization. 

The paper explains that these evolutionary changes are happening more quickly than originally thought and may “have significant implications for ecological and human well-being.”

Meet the poo-sniffin’ pooches of Conservation Canines Saving endangered species one scat at a time

Conservation Canines knows poop. In fact, its fridge is full of “poops” from all over the world. 

At a training facility tucked into a cool corner of UW’s Pack Forest near the foot of Mt. Rainier, the Conservation Canines team trains dogs to sniff out the scat of a variety of animals. Since 1997, they’ve been collecting a myriad of scat to study, ranging from that of local killer whales to tigers in Cambodia to the sesame-seed-sized pooh of Pacific pocket mice. 

Rolandi Research Group develops new water purification system

With the use of a biomaterial found in crustacean shells, the Rolandi Research Group at the UW is working to develop a water purification system for people in developing countries.

This biomaterial, chitin, can be extracted from most crustacean shells, though the research group is specifically working with crab and shrimp shells. Chitin acts as a filter: It absorbs dyes, metals, contaminants, pathogens, and microorganisms from water.


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